:: eyedot ::: images information ideation ::

:: EYE (anatomy), light-sensitive organ of vision in animals.
:: EYE (verb), to look at to look at something or somebody inquisitively.
:: EYE (noun), an ability to recognize and appreciate something; a point of view or way of thinking.

[::..archive..::]
April 2003
May 2003
June 2003
July 2003
August 2003
September 2003
October 2003
November 2003
December 2003
January 2004
February 2004
March 2004
April 2004
May 2004
June 2004
July 2004
August 2004
September 2004
October 2004
November 2004
December 2004
January 2005
February 2005
March 2005
April 2005
May 2005
September 2005
December 2005
January 2006
February 2006
March 2006
April 2006
May 2006
June 2006
July 2006
August 2006
September 2006
October 2006
November 2006
[::..political..::]
:: media matters ::
:: watchblog ::
:: cost of war clock ::
:: doctors w/o borders ::
:: hungersite ::
:: second harvest ::
:: working assets ::
:: democracy now! ::
:: common cause ::
:: ACTIVISM LINKS ::
:: daily mojo ::
:: gary hart ::
:: this modern world ::
:: people tree ::

[::..comix..::]
:: get your war on ::
:: scary go round ::
:: get fuzzy ::
:: explodingdog ::
:: penny arcade ::
:: homestarrunner ::
:: dieselsweeties ::
:: orneryboy ::
:: perry bible fellowship ::
:: butternutsquash ::
:: this modern world ::

[::..music..::]
:: WFMU streaming radio ::
:: accuradio ::
:: 20minuteloop ::
:: bjork ::
:: onelovehiphop ::
:: erp ::

[::..random + cool..::]
:: boingboing ::
:: fark ::
:: mit ocw ::
:: abebooks ::
:: ursula k leguin ::
:: jon cornforth photos ::
:: sylvia ::
:: lucas krech blog ::
:: noodlebox ::
:: lot47films ::
:: nakd ::
:: lynn fox ::
:: nooflat ::
:: jeff bridges blog ::
:: novica ::
:: ugly dolls ::
:: gama-go ::
:: presstube ::


:: 10.25.2004 ::  



Nearly 380 Tons of Explosives Missing from Iraq atomic site

I can't wait to hear how the administration justifies this.
The New York Times report cited White House and Pentagon officials -- as well as at least one Iraqi minister -- as acknowledging that the explosives vanished from the site shortly after the U.S.-led invasion amid widespread looting.

The minister of science and technology, Rashad M. Omar, confirmed the explosives were missing in an interview with The Times and CBS Television in Baghdad.

A Western diplomat close to the IAEA, who declined to be named, said it was hard to understand why the U.S. military had failed to secure the facility despite knowing how sensitive it was.

"This was a very well known site. If you could have picked a few sites that you would have to secure then ... Al Qaqaa would certainly be one of the main ones," the diplomat said.
The above quote is from a YahooNews story; here's one from the NYTimes story from this morning:
The International Atomic Energy Agency publicly warned about the danger of these explosives before the war, and after the invasion it specifically told United States officials about the need to keep the explosives secured, European diplomats said in interviews last week. Administration officials say they cannot explain why the explosives were not safeguarded, beyond the fact that the occupation force was overwhelmed by the amount of munitions they found throughout the country.
Yet another mistake? That list is getting pretty long.


Followup

As Rich pointed out to me, there is actually some doubt as to whether the explosives in question were still at Al Qaqaa when the US invaded Iraq:
In the NBC report cited by the Bush campaign, the reporter embedded with American troops when they visited Al Qaqaa on April 10, 2003, the day after Baghdad fell, said she did not see any explosives.

Bush campaign spokesman Steve Schmidt said the NBC report showed that Kerry's allegations were "baseless."

But the reporter, Lai Ling Jew, said in an interview Tuesday on the network's cable arm, MSNBC, that the 24-hour visit by elements of the 101st Airborne Division was "more of a pit stop."

U.S. troops did not conduct a detailed search of the compound nor did they try to prevent looting, she said.

The IAEA said Tuesday the last time it can vouch for the presence of the explosives at Al Qaqaa was in March 2003, before the U.S.-led invasion that toppled Saddam.
From CNN.

:: Deb 10:46 AM :: permalink :: [0] comments :: links to this post ::


Comments:



Post a Comment


Links to this post:

Create a Link

This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?