:: eyedot ::: images information ideation ::

:: EYE (anatomy), light-sensitive organ of vision in animals.
:: EYE (verb), to look at to look at something or somebody inquisitively.
:: EYE (noun), an ability to recognize and appreciate something; a point of view or way of thinking.

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:: 7.18.2006 ::  

If Justice Scalia thinks so, it must be true

On June 26th, The Supreme Court narrowly upheld a Kansas statute that "requires juries to sentence a defendant to death as the default sentence over life in prison if there is equal evidence for and against imposing the death penalty." The decision itself has generated debate, but Justice Scalia's concurring opinion is much more controversial: "...in every case of an executed defendant of which I'm aware, [DNA] technology has confirmed guilt."
In a July 2 op-ed published in The Anniston Star, Mr. Dieter addresses Justice Scalia's claim that exonerations prove the system works. "In some cases, that is, thankfully, true. But in many cases, it was only the fortuitous advent of scientific DNA testing that freed the individual, or the dogged work of journalism students, or the pro bono work of a large law firm -- services available only to a handful of the thousands of individuals on death row -- that saved these lives." However,
[Richard Dieter is executive director of the Death Penalty Information Center - Deb]
Read more about it, here.

:: Deb 12:16 PM :: permalink :: [0] comments :: links to this post ::


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